UA-53205790-2 Cat Research Archives - The Daily Cat

Category Archives: Cat Research

Yes Cats Know Their Names | Now There’s Proof

Do cats know their names? A study says they do, although they may choose to ignore you when you call.

New study shows cats know their names.

A new study shows cats know their names.

It’s official. Our worst suspicions are confirmed. A new study shows cats know their names. So if they don’t come when you call, they really are ignoring you. 

A team from the University of Tokyo watched 76 cats listen to recorded words that included their names. 

Although the cats seemed to tune out most of the human conversation, they all reacted when they heard their names, no matter who was saying them. 

But that didn’t mean they ran into their loving humans’ arms. They showed recognition by moving their heads or ears or twitching their tails

Cats Know Their Names And Understand Words With A Purpose

Study Shows Today’s Cats Are Bigger Than Their Wild Ancestors

Unlike other species, today’s cats are bigger than their ancestors. But no one seems to know why.

Today's cats are bigger than their ancestors.

Today’s cats are bigger than their ancestors, but no one seems to know why.

Most species, including dogs, get smaller when they become domesticated. But, perhaps due to their sometimes perverse nature, today’s cats are bigger than their wild ancestors were. 

Why are cats different? No one knows for sure, but experts theorize the reason might be as simple as regular meals.

And it’s possible that this applies only to cats in Denmark. That’s where researchers had the grisly task of sifting through bags of ancient animal bones looking for some that belonged to cats. 

The Vikings And Seafaring Cats

Transdermal Furosemide For Cats May Be Ineffective

Study shows transdermal furosemide for cats may be ineffective.

 

Study shows transdermal furosemide for cats may be ineffective.

Study shows transdermal furosemide for cats may be ineffective.

If you use transdermal meds for your cat with heart disease, this isn’t the best news. A new study published by the Winn Feline Foundation found that transdermal furosemide (Lasix) “is unlikely to be effective.”

The study looked at just six cats though, so perhaps we shouldn’t leap to conclusions just yet. 


Furosemide For Cats ‘The Mainstay Of Therapy’

Cats And Their People Share Personality Traits

Study shows cats and their people share personality traits.

Study shows cats and their people share personality traits

Do you tend to be moody? Chances are your cat does, too.

Have you been thinking your cat’s almost as introverted as you are? Turns out that’s not just the idle thought of a slightly crazy cat lady. A new study shows that cats and their people share personality traits. Or that’s what the humans think. No one asked the cats.

Researchers in Australia asked people who live with cats to complete a 52-question online survey about their personalities and their cats’. Then, they used a sophisticated computer program to analyze the data. What it came up with was five general types of cat personalities. Three overlap with human personality traits. 


How Cats And Their People Share Personality Traits

Study Shows Link Between Kidney & Dental Disease In Cats

A recent study shows a link between kidney and dental disease in cats. FVRCP vaccinations are implicated, too. 

Brush your cat's teeth! A recent study shows a link between kidney disease and dental disease in cars.

Brushing your cat’s teeth could help ward off kidney disease.

If you’ve been putting off that dental your cat needs, maybe you should drop everything and call the veterinary dentist right now. A new study confirms what vets have suspected for a long time: There’s a link between dental and chronic kidney disease in cats.

The study, reported by the Winn Feline Foundation, looked at 56,414 cats who had periodontal disease when their vet clinics enrolled them in the study. Researchers followed them for 11 years.


Which Cats Are Most At Risk Of Kidney Disease?

Feline Diabetes Risk Factors: Dry Cat Food & Cats Living Strictly Indoors

A new study shows dry food and a strictly indoor lifestyle are two risk factors for feline diabetes.

 

Getting a cat outside on a harness and leash can reduce the risk of feline diabetes.

Getting a cat outside on a harness and leash can reduce the risk of feline diabetes.

Here’s a good reason for making sure your cats get some outdoor time. Among the feline diabetes risk factors: dry food and living strictly indoors. This news comes from a study by a Swedish pet insurance company and published by the Winn Feline Foundation.

Using a Web-based survey, the insurance company looked at 396 diabetic cats and 1670 control cats. Among the findings: The risk of feline diabetes increases for inactive and moderately active cats who live strictly indoors.

All of the cats in the study were the same age.

The cats least likely to develop diabetes: females, cats who are not overweight, cats who have access to outdoors and cats who free feed (but not dry food). Living with a dog helps, too!


Top Feline Diabetes Risk Factors

Do Cat Colors Dictate Personality? Maybe…

It’s never good to paint things with a broad brush, but a study shows cat colors dictate personality.

 

A study shows cat colors dictate personality, and that could be why this torti has an abundance of "cattitude."

Does your torti have an abundance of cattitude? Blame her colors.

Are you thinking your tortie gives new meaning to the word “catitude?” Is your calico a bit feisty when things aren’t going exactly her way? A study by UC Davis veterinarian Elizabeth Stelow shows that cat colors dictate personality. And that proves what a lot of us have suspected all along. Torties and calicoes tend to be diva cats and can be more than a little challenging to their people.

Stelow and her research team surveyed 1200 cat parents online. They found that calico and tortoiseshell cats are more likely to “hiss, chase, bite, swat or scratch during interactions with humans.” Gray and white and black and white cats seem to have an abundance of cattitude, too and are likely to be a bit more aggressive than cats with other coat patterns.

 

 

Can Cats Cause Road Rage?

Study shows cats cause road rage … maybe.

 

How could sweet, cuddly cats cause road rage?

Is it possible that our sweet, cuddly cats cause road rage?

And now, from the What Will They Blame On Cats Next department, comes this news: Cats cause road rage. I can think of a couple of reasons why cats would infuriate their people. Not using the litter box comes to mind. But the scientists who came up with the road rage theory would say it’s using the litter box, not failing to use it, that could cause sudden angry outbursts and road rage.


Blame It On Toxoplasmosis

Finally — The Truth About FIV Cats

Research confirms it! FIV cats can live with other cats without infecting them.

 

FIV cats can go outside like this one and live with other cats without infecting them.

This study could change the lives of many FIV cats.

Finally. It’s official. FIV cats can live with other cats and not infect them.

Veterinarian Annette L. Litster of Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine’s Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, studied more than 100 cats who were in rescue group shelters. The cats were not in cages but lived together in a group home setting. Her research was published in a recent issue of Veterinary Journal.

Litster initially tested 138 cohabiting cats with Rescue Group One. At the time, eight of the cats tested positive for FIV. The others were all negative. When she did a  second test 28 months later, the 45 negative cats who were still there were still negative. She got the same results 38 months after the first tests. By then, all but four of the negative cats and seven of the eight positive cats had been adopted.

“These results show a lack of evidence of FIV transmission, despite years of exposure to naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats in a mixed household,” she wrote.

Now if veterinarians will just read the study and believe it.


FIV Should Not Be A Death Sentence