Coronavirus And Cats: 5 Things To Know

No, you can’t get the new coronavirus or COVID-19 from your cat. And she can’t get it from you. But there are some things to know about the coronavirus and cats that could help keep both of you healthy. And yes, as Mom said at least once a day when you were a kid, wash your hands. Often.

Don't worry about coronavirus and cats.. It can't be transmitted from cats and dogs to humans.

They’re innocent! Cats and dogs can’t transmit the new coronavirus to humans.

So you read about the dog in China who tested positive for the new coronavirus, and now you’re eyeing your cat with suspicion and just a little bit of fear. But infected humans are not the cats’ fault! Numerous world and national health agencies say COVID-19 can’t be transmitted from cats and dogs to humans. You might be able to give it to your cat though. Not that she’ll get sick. 

Coronaviruses tend to be species-specific. So while the coronavirus and cats is probably not an issue for either of you, your cat has plenty of her own coronaviruses to worry about.

The New Coronavirus And Cats: Five Things To Do

While you can’t get COVID-19 from your cat, and it’s unlikely she’ll get it from you, the worldwide pandemic could disrupt her life almost as much as it disrupts yours. 

Here are five ways to lessen the impact of the coronavirus and cats. 

1. If your cat’s on medication, stock up. Most of our generic medications come from China, and there could be interruptions in the supply chain. Stock up on your own medications, too!

2. Also stock up on food and litter, again to protect against supply chain interruptions. My worry about coronavirus and cats is that the online retailers where I shop will need to close warehouses. 

3. Wash your hands before and after you touch your cat.

4. If she goes out, ask your neighbors to observe the same social distancing practices with her as they do with each other.

5. Be prepared. Line up a friend, neighbor or pet sitter to take care of your cat if you get sick. Also, put together a preparedness kit that includes detailed instructions for your cat’s care and her medical records. If you must care for her yourself, the American Veterinary Medical Association suggests wearing a face mask and not hugging or kissing the cat. And don’t forget to wash your hands before and after you touch her

Could A Cat Drug Help Humans With COVID-19?

For cats, the most dangerous coronavirus is the one that can mutate into FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis). Until recently, FIP was almost always deadly. But researcher and veterinarian Niels Pedersen found that the compound GS-441524 can cure FIP. Since it’s not yet available in the US, you have to order it from China.

GS-441524 is very similar to the human drug, Remdesivir, and Pederson is wondering if it could cure COVID-19. Both drugs work by blocking the virus’s ability to replicate.

Remdesivir is undergoing clinical trials in China and at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. 

But What About The Dog In China?

No one is quite sure why the Pomeranian in China tested weak positive for COVID-19. But scientists suspect he picked it up when his owner, who’s infected with the coronavirus touched him.

The virus sticks to surfaces, including, apparently, dog and maybe cat fur. So that’s why it’s worth repeating, once again, wash your hands before you touch your cat!

Get Cat News You Can Use
Delivered Right To Your In Box

 

Tabby-cat-reading-newspaper-1

About This Blog 

We all love to read about cats. Check here for the latest news about cat food, must-have cat toys, cat healthcare and more. I hope you enjoy the posts. And when you’re all caught up on the news, I hope you’ll visit How To Live With Cats, my cat care website, and Thomasina’s blog, Purrls of Wisdom About Cats. In case you’re wondering, Thomasina’s a cat!

Browse By Topic

 Freelance Writing

If you have a vet clinic, grooming shop or pet supply store, I’d love to write about cats for your blog. To find out how we can work together, write to missyzane@comcast.net.

 About Out Ads

We have an affiliate relationship with Google, Amazon and others. When visitors click on an ad or link and make a purchase, we earn a small commission that helps keep this blog running and the cats fed.

Leave Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recommended
A new test uses artificial intelligence to predict kidney disease…