Do Cat Colors Dictate Personality? Maybe…

It’s never good to paint things with a broad brush, but a study shows cat colors dictate personality.

 

A study shows cat colors dictate personality, and that could be why this torti has an abundance of "cattitude."

Does your torti have an abundance of cattitude? Blame her colors.

Are you thinking your tortie gives new meaning to the word “catitude?” Is your calico a bit feisty when things aren’t going exactly her way? A study by UC Davis veterinarian Elizabeth Stelow shows that cat colors dictate personality. And that proves what a lot of us have suspected all along. Torties and calicoes tend to be diva cats and can be more than a little challenging to their people.

Stelow and her research team surveyed 1200 cat parents online. They found that calico and tortoiseshell cats are more likely to “hiss, chase, bite, swat or scratch during interactions with humans.” Gray and white and black and white cats seem to have an abundance of cattitude, too and are likely to be a bit more aggressive than cats with other coat patterns.

 

 

Cats With Cancer – A Different Kind Of Treatment

Veterinary oncologists suggest a different, gentler kind of treatment for cats with cancer.

Cats with cancer could benefit from a different kind of treatment.

If you have a cat with cancer, he may benefit from a different kind of treatment.

Think about the sound of a metronome. It’s always steady and often slow. And now its name is inspiring a different way of treating cats with cancer.

Conventional treatment using chemotherapy for cats with cancer calls for giving the drug at the maximally tolerated dose. But patients need a rest period between treatments to allow healthy cells to repair and regenerate and to minimize side effects.

Cancer cells never rest, though. And during the break in treatment, damaged tumor blood vessels can recover along with healthy cells, lessening the benefit of the treatment.


Enter Metronomic Chemotherapy For Treating Cats With Cancer

The Daily Cat Quote

“I thought maybe she’d whisk us off by magic, or at least hail a taxi. Instead, Bast borrowed a silver Lexus convertible.“Oh, yes,” she purred. “I like this one! Come along, children.”“But this isn’t yours,” I pointed out.“My dear, I’m a cat. Everything I see is mine.” She touched the ignition and the keyhole sparked.…

Pet Insurance Goes To Work
A Growing Number Of Companies Offer Pet Insurance As A Benefit

A growing number of companies are offering pet insurance as a benefit.

 

A growing number of companies are offering pet insurance as a benefit.

Is pet insurance a benefit where you work?

Is the cost of kitty’s health care making you feel a bit sick? If you’re lucky, your employer is one of a growing number of companies that offer pet insurance as a benefit.

According to Nationwide Insurance, the owner of VPI Pet Insurance, health care coverage for companion animals is one of the fastest-growing voluntary benefits in the U.S. More than 5,000 companies and organizations now offer Nationwide, and other pet insurance companies have corporate clients, too.


Pet Insurance Posts Record Growth

Can Cats Cause Road Rage?

Study shows cats cause road rage … maybe.

 

How could sweet, cuddly cats cause road rage?

Is it possible that our sweet, cuddly cats cause road rage?

And now, from the What Will They Blame On Cats Next department, comes this news: Cats cause road rage. I can think of a couple of reasons why cats would infuriate their people. Not using the litter box comes to mind. But the scientists who came up with the road rage theory would say it’s using the litter box, not failing to use it, that could cause sudden angry outbursts and road rage.


Blame It On Toxoplasmosis

Finally — The Truth About FIV Cats

Research confirms it! FIV cats can live with other cats without infecting them.

 

FIV cats can go outside like this one and live with other cats without infecting them.

This study could change the lives of many FIV cats.

Finally. It’s official. FIV cats can live with other cats and not infect them.

Veterinarian Annette L. Litster of Purdue University’s College of Veterinary Medicine’s Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, studied more than 100 cats who were in rescue group shelters. The cats were not in cages but lived together in a group home setting. Her research was published in a recent issue of Veterinary Journal.

Litster initially tested 138 cohabiting cats with Rescue Group One. At the time, eight of the cats tested positive for FIV. The others were all negative. When she did a  second test 28 months later, the 45 negative cats who were still there were still negative. She got the same results 38 months after the first tests. By then, all but four of the negative cats and seven of the eight positive cats had been adopted.

“These results show a lack of evidence of FIV transmission, despite years of exposure to naturally-infected, FIV-positive cats in a mixed household,” she wrote.

Now if veterinarians will just read the study and believe it.


FIV Should Not Be A Death Sentence