Can You Stop A Cat From Hunting? Surprisingly, You Can!

Do Cat Colors Dictate Personality? Maybe…

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It’s never good to paint things with a broad brush, but a study shows cat colors dictate personality.

 

A study shows cat colors dictate personality, and that could be why this torti has an abundance of "cattitude."

Does your torti have an abundance of cattitude? Blame her colors.

Are you thinking your tortie gives new meaning to the word “catitude?” Is your calico a bit feisty when things aren’t going exactly her way? A study by UC Davis veterinarian Elizabeth Stelow shows that cat colors dictate personality. And that proves what a lot of us have suspected all along. Torties and calicoes tend to be diva cats and can be more than a little challenging to their people.

Stelow and her research team surveyed 1200 cat parents online. They found that calico and tortoiseshell cats are more likely to “hiss, chase, bite, swat or scratch during interactions with humans.” Gray and white and black and white cats seem to have an abundance of cattitude, too and are likely to be a bit more aggressive than cats with other coat patterns.

 

 

Music To Your (Cat’s) Ears

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You know that music you play for your cats when you’re away? It’s just white noise to them. But what they might really like is music for cats by David Teie.

 

Could this kitten be listening to music for cats by David Teie?

Could this kitten be listening to music for cats by David Teie?

If you leave a radio on for your cats when you’re not at home, they probably appreciate the “white noise.” But a study by University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologist Charles Snowdon shows that whatever they’re listening to isn’t exactly music to their ears.

Turns out that species other than humans can enjoy music, but it has to be in the frequency range that species use to communicate and with tempos they would normally use.

Snowdon first tested this theory, suggested by musician David Teie, on cotton-topped tamarin monkeys. While they showed little interest in music written for humans, Teie says they “displayed a marked increase of activity” when they heard the music he composed just for them.

As he explains it on his website, “all mammals are born with templates of sound in the brain that govern emotional response. Many of these templates come as ‘standard equipment’ and are not always learned…

“If someone were to scream in your presence your heart rate would increase; there is no way for you to prevent it. You would not, however, respond similarly to the alarm call of a squirrel.